Sam Francis

Untitled, 1984

106.7 X 73 inch

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What is a screen-print?

What is a screen-print?

Refers to a print produced through a printing technique in which a ink is transferred using a mesh to a substrate safe for those areas blocked with a stencil to make them impermeable to ink. Screen prints are usually made on posters, T-shirts, vinyl, stickers and wood or any material usable for this purpose. Screen printing is also a method of stencil printing and is sometimes known as serigraphy, serigraph printing, screen or silk screen. 

Image © Petr Lerch/Shutterstock

Hank Willis Thomas

All Li es Matter, 2017

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

USD 2,970

KAWS

What Party (7), 2020

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Donald Sultan

Mimosa, 2009

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Roy Lichtenstein

Composition IV , 1995

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Andy Warhol

Flowers (Black & White), 1974

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Andy Warhol

Campbell’s Soup II: Vegetarian Vegetable, 1969

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Keith Haring

Pop Shop II (2), 1988

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Javacheff Christo

America House, Heidelberg, Monuments 5600 m3 Paket,Kassel

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

EUR 3,300

Victor Vasarely

Untitled II,

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Yin Jun

Crying, 2008

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

Currently Not Available

Keith Haring

Growing I, 1988

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Andy Warhol

Mick Jagger (F & S II.138), 1975

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Roy Lichtenstein

Composition I, 1996

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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William Kentridge

No Idea Thought Image, 2016

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

EUR 800

Luc Tuymans

Wiedergutmachung, 1995

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

EUR 1,900

Sol LeWitt

Plate 7, 1978

Limited Edition Print

Screen-print

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Kinetic art

International movement referring to both apparent and real motion of art created in the 1920s and 1960s. It is explained as art emerging from any medium containing some movement that depends on motion for effect or can be perceived by the viewer. Canvas paintings are some of the notable and earliest examples of this art type. Speaking pertinently, kinetic art today refers to 3 dimensional figures and sculptures such as those operated by machines or those that move naturally. It encompasses a variety of styles and techniques that overlap.

Sound Art

Artistic discipline where sound is used as a medium. Like the other contemporary art genres, Sound Art is interdisciplinary in its nature. It can engage with a wide range of subjects that include electronics, acoustics, noise music, psychoacoustics, audio media, video or film and sculpture among other subjects. Early examples of sound art include Luigi Russolo's noise intoners and other experiments done by surrealists, Dadaists and happenings of Fluxus among others.

Intervention Art

Art that interacts with a previously existing audience, artwork, situation and venue/space. It has conceptual art's auspice and commonly takes the form of a performance art. It is associated with Dada Movement, Neo-Dadaists and Viennese Actionists. Stuckists have made much use of intervention art to effect other artwork's perceptions they are opposed to and or protest against the existing intervention.

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